conferences \ tech

Women In Tech

When I was an engineering major at Georgia Tech, I learned how to program with if then statements. If then statements are the basic programming to execute a code.  In real life, there is no simple “if then”. Most of people’s responses in life are more nuanced and based on an individual’s perspective, experience and identity. Unfortunately, some developers, hackers, and the like have translated if then statements as a code of conduct when dealing with people.

If a woman works in the tech startup community and attends a conference, then all jokes should be shrugged off?

If a person is offended, then should the offender be immediately fired?

If a man who has three kids loses a job, then wouldn’t the response be against the company who fired and not the company where the woman works?

If people online conclude that a woman is responsible for a man losing his job, then should rape and death threats and hate speech be launched immediately all over the internet?

If some people got their emails, then can a DDoS be faked?

If some tech blogs don’t include the rape and death threats in their reporting, then are they being irresponsible?

If tech startups lack essential human resources and public relations, then can they effectively handle situations like this?

If humans can’t treat humans with respect, then can we just program ethical robots to take over?

 

 

conferences

Influencer10

Influencer10,influencer,tastemaker,branding,marketing,social media,fashion,Nyne Lyves,NY Times,Heineken,Livestream,Served Fresh Media,Nicole Miller,Jana Water,Tokoin Factory,Mark Ecko,World Management Group
Thursday and Friday, I attended the Influencer10 conference which took place at 45 Bleecker.  I really like the panel discussions which centered around influence. The first panel was about innovators and influencers.  You can be inherently innovative, but can you be inherently an influencer. In my opinion, influencers are often more extroverted.  They have to be out there for people to see them and be influenced by them.

Key Takeaways from Influencer10:

Digital literacy is incredibly important.

The more an influencer TRIES to influence, the less influence they actually have.

Be true to yourself.

If you can engage a core fan base, then you are rock solid.

Respect your digital self the same way you respect your personal self.

We are not monolithic.

conferences

Upcoming Conferences

cupcakes and cocktails 008

I have been busy working on my career and business. Fourth quarter 2010 is going to be great. In October, I will be headed to Las Vegas for Blog World Expo. I will be speaking at Tech Munch Vegas on October 16th on the panel, Food Trends & Curating Flavors On The Web: How To Come Up With Great Content.

I am also planning on going to SXSW again next March. Please vote for my panel: Blogging & Social Media for Niche Audiences.

Two other unconferences on my radar is Pod Camp Philly and Lavish in Atlanta.

conferences \ twitter

140Conference Day 1

For some strange reason, I thought that the 140Conf was at 92YTribeca, not the 92nd Street Y. So I had schlep from the “Lower West Side”  near the Holland Tunnel to the Upper East Side.

I got inside around 10AM to hear the end of Dan Harple’s presentation. He was talking about creating places and experiences. Gypsii.

Chris Lehmann excellent presentation about School 2.0. He is the principal of the Science Leadership Academy. Classes cannot be silos but lens to view the world.

Jeffrey Hayzlett, CMO at Kodak, and now famous for his appearance on Celebrity Apprentice. Regarding ROI for using twitter, Hazlett says “forget return on investment. it’s return on ignoring.”

Ivanka Trump was  interviewed by Jeffrey Hazlett. “To develop your brand means you have to be extremely consistent.”

Chris Weingarten. His presentation/rant was great. “Firsties! The race to be first is the most insidious fucking Ebola virus to hit the internet. When clicks are your lifeblood, good writing dies. Don’t let math dictate your music choices. Don’t believe the Hype Machine.”

Andrea Syrtash used relationship advice to apply to Twitter relationships.1. Worry less about impressing others. Let others impressed you. 2. You can’t have intimacy without vulnerability. 3. People want to be challenged-not changed.”

Joan Walsh from Salon lead a panel on Twitter rules when talking about race. Follow a diverse group. Don’t use lazy words.

ElonJames.Don’t be a douchebag. If you write something, and makes someone uncomfortable, then tweet it.

Prof Blair Kelley.Tweet as you who are. Make sure you have the time. Always use evidence. Don’t use the word “racist” or “racism”.

Liza Sabater. Harness your inner asshole. Vocabulary matters. Use emoticons when being snarky.

You may have heard the expression, there is no free lunch.  I never thought it would apply to a conference. I stopped taking notes after getting lunch at Effy’s Cafe and tweeted a little during the rest of the afternoon.